Patient-Reported Outcome Measures Used in Randomized Controlled Trials Following Surgical Intervention for Endometriosis: A Structured Review from the AAGL Practice Guidelines Group

Objective: No consensus currently exists regarding patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) instruments. This structured review was conducted to identify the PROMs used by randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated surgical treatment in patients with endometriosis.

Data sources: Two parallel searches were conducted by a medical librarian using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, and Cochrane Library for RCTs published from 2000 to July 2022. One search focused on studies reporting quality of life (QoL), and the second search focused on studies reporting pain and sexual, bowel, and bladder function.

Method of study selection: During the title and abstract screening and reference check, 600 results were identified on PROMs relating to QoL and 465 studies on PROMs relating to pain and sexual, bowel, and/or bladder function and an evaluation of 17 and 12 studies conducted, respectively. The inclusion criteria involved selecting RCTs that focused on surgical intervention and assessing QoL, pain, and sexual, bowel, and/or bladder function using PROMs.

Tabulation, integration, and results: Covidence software was used to organize and identify duplicate articles through screening. We developed a data extraction form to collect key information about each included study, as well as the pertinent PROMs used in the study. Assessment of the risk of bias of each study was also performed. A total of 19 studies were identified involving 2089 participants and a total of 16 PROMs used across the studies; 9 of 19 studies (47%) were rated as having a low risk of bias. There were no high-risk studies identified in this review.

Conclusion: This study identified a large number of RCTs in surgical treatment of endometriosis that used various PROMs to assess QoL, pain, and bladder, bowel, and sexual function. The PROMs used by high-quality RCTs for QoL include Endometriosis Health Profile-30, Endometriosis Health Profile-5, Short-Form 36, Short-Form 12, and EQ-5D; for bowel-related symptoms Knowles-Eccersley-Scott-Symptom Questionnaire, Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index, and Cleveland Clinic Fecal Incontinence Severity Scoring System/Wexner; for bladder-related function Bristol Female Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms, International Prostate Symptom Score, Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire, and Urinary Symptom Profile; and finally for sexual function Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire and Sexual Activity Questionnaire. Unlike other domains, only one tool (visual analog scale) was the dominant PROM used for the assessment of pain. In addition, the use of more than one PROM in each study to assess different aspects of patient's health and pain symptoms did not become prevalent until after 2015.

Contributors

Jason Abbott, Megan Billow, Thomas Gallant, Loren Hackett, Rosanne M Kho, Blake Knapman, Miguel A Luna Russo, Sarah Maheux-Lacroix, Adriana Meneses Gonzalez, Cecilia Ng, Megan S Orlando, Andrea Sit, Xiao Xu

Publication

Journal: Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology
Volume: 31
Issue: 2
Pages: 71 - 83
Year: 2024
DOI: 10.1016/j.jmig.2023.10.017

Further Study Information

Current Stage: Completed
Date:
Funding source(s):


Health Area

Disease Category: Urology

Disease Name: Endometriosis

Target Population

Age Range: Unknown

Sex: Female

Nature of Intervention: Surgery

Stakeholders Involved

Study Type

- Systematic review of outcomes measured in trials

Method(s)

- Systematic review

Two parallel searches were conducted by a medical librarian using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid Embase, and Cochrane Library for RCTs published from 2000 to July 2022. One search focused on studies reporting quality of life (QoL), and the second search focused on studies reporting pain and sexual, bowel, and bladder function.

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